Relative age dating of rocks activity

Posted by / 15-Jun-2017 15:47

Relative age dating of rocks activity

A global map from NASA of how Earth’s surface temperatures last month departed from the 1951-1980 August average. Note: part of Antarctica is gray because data from some stations there were not yet available at the time of this analysis.) Last month was among the very warmest on record, according to two new analyses – and the heat is very likely to continue.

With less than four months left to go in 2017, the year will probably come in as second or third warmest on record.

Yulsman has written one book: Origins: the Quest for Our Cosmic Roots, published by the Institute of Physics in 2003.

Terrestrial planets have hard surfaces that can be re-shaped by several different processes: impact cratering, volcanism, erosion, and tectonics.

Relatively cool conditions in the Arctic – see the blue tones in the global map at the top of this story — helped tamp down the global average in August.

These conditions persisted into September, helping to limit the loss of sea ice in the high north.

Two agencies have produced very slightly different verdicts for this past August.

NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies has found that last month was the second warmest August globally in 137 years of modern record-keeping, surpassed only by August 2016.

The craters on all of the moons except Io, Mercury, and most of the ones on Mars are from impacts.

In its independent analysis, NOAA pegged it at 0.83 degrees C warmer.

“The measured value is consistent with the trend in global average surface temperatures that has been observed during the past few decades,” NASA noted.

Impacts as large as the one that led to the demise of the dinosaurs in much more recent history were happening about once a month.

Most of the impact basins---craters measured in hundreds of kilometers---were made during this time.

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SEE ALSO: As his Tweet above indicates, Gavin Schmidt, the head of NASA’s climate monitoring efforts, predicts that there’s a greater than 80 percent chance that 2017 will come in as the second warmest year in records dating back to 1880, to be surpassed only by 2016.